10-21-18 – Autumn in the Sierras



The natural landscape in the Eastern Sierra, where rugged granite canyons are carved by rushing streams and framed by an azure sky, offers a spellbinding contrast of colors during autumn golden, crimson and orange aspen and cottonwoods as far as the eye can see.

10-14-18 – Mono Lake



Mono Lake (/ˈmoʊnoʊ/ MOH-noh) is a large, shallow saline soda lake in Mono County, California, formed at least 760,000 years ago as a terminal lake in an endorheic basin. The lack of an outlet causes high levels of salts to accumulate in the lake. These salts also make the lake water alkaline.

This desert lake has an unusually productive ecosystem based on brine shrimp that thrive in its waters, and provides critical habitat for two million annual migratory birds that feed on the shrimp and alkali flies. Historically, the native Kutzadika’a people derived nutrition from the Ephydra hians pupae, which live in the shallow waters around the edge of the lake.

When the city of Los Angeles diverted water from the freshwater streams flowing into the lake, it lowered the lake level, which imperiled the migratory birds.

10-14-18 – Aspendell



Aspendell, CA. Higher in elevation than Donner Pass & Truckee, this Eastern Sierra granite canyon is located north of Mount Whitney, along the upper portion of Bishop Creek. The large groves of aspen trees can be spectacular in autumn.

07-11-18 – Sequoia National Park



The park is notable for its giant sequoia trees, including the General Sherman tree, the largest tree on Earth. The General Sherman tree grows in the Giant Forest, which contains five of the ten largest trees in the world. The Giant Forest is connected by the Generals Highway to Kings Canyon National Park’s General Grant Grove, home of the General Grant tree among other giant sequoias. The park’s giant sequoia forests are part of 202,430 acres of old-growth forests shared by Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. The parks preserve a landscape that still resembles the southern Sierra Nevada before Euro-American settlement.

05-28_29-18 – North Rim Grand Canyon



A worthwhile trip for those who enjoy the road less traveled, the North Rim, or “other side” of Grand Canyon is visited by only 10% of all Grand Canyon visitors. The centerpiece of the park is the Grand Canyon, a gorge of the Colorado River. The Grand Canyon is 277 miles (446 km) long, up to 18 miles (29 km) wide and attains a depth of over a mile (6,000 feet or 1,800 metres). Nearly two billion years of the Earth’s geological history have been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted. Designated as an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979.

05-02-18 – Morro Bay



Morro Bay is a coastal city in California. It’s known for Morro Rock, an ancient volcanic mound at the end of Morro Rock Beach. The rock sits within Morro Bay State Park, home to lagoons, trails and a bird-rich saltwater marsh. Morro Bay State Park’s Museum of Natural History features exhibits on ecology and local Native American culture.

04-07-18 – Exposition Park Rose Garden



The Exposition Park Rose Garden is a now historic 7-acre sunken garden located in Exposition Park in Los Angeles, California. It has been called “one of the city’s best-kept secrets”. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1991.

04-07-18 – Space Shuttle Endeavour



Space Shuttle Endeavour is a retired orbiter from NASA’s Space Shuttle program and the fifth and final operational shuttle built. It embarked on its first mission, STS-49, in May 1992 and its 25th and final mission, STS-134, in May 2011.

04-07-18 – King Tut: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh


To celebrate the 100-year anniversary of the discovery of King Tut’s tomb, the California Science Center proudly presents the world premiere of KING TUT TREASURES OF THE GOLDEN PHARAOH–the largest King Tut exhibition ever toured! Discover over 150 authentic artifacts from King Tut’s celebrated tomb–60 of which have never traveled outside of Egypt, until now.

04-07-18 – Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is the largest natural and historical museum in the western United States. Its collections include nearly 35 million specimens and artifacts and cover 4.5 billion years of history.

Tattoo is an exhibition 5,000 years in the making. The art of marking skin with ink spans cultures, continents, and has evolved over time. We find ourselves with a mysterious fascination with both ancient and modern tattoo practices. Are they considered a part of sacred ritual or an act of rebellion? A sign of belonging or expression of individuality? In the special exhibit, you’ll explore the history, technique, motivation, and sheer artistic genius that are connected to one another by ink.