Tag Archives: hoodoo

05-12-21 – Goblin Valley State Park


Goblin Valley State Park is a state park of Utah, in the United States. The park features thousands of hoodoos, referred to locally as goblins, which are formations of mushroom-shaped rock pinnacles, some as tall as several yards (meters). The distinct shapes of these rocks result from an erosion-resistant layer of rock atop relatively softer sandstone. Goblin Valley State Park and Bryce Canyon National Park, also in Utah about 190 miles (310 km) to the southwest, contain some of the largest occurrences of hoodoos in the world.

The unusual stone shapes in Goblin Valley result from the weathering of Entrada sandstone. The Entrada consists of debris eroded from former highlands and redeposited on a former tidal flat of alternating layers of sandstone, siltstone, and shale. The rocks show evidence of being near the margins of an ancient sea with the ebb and flow of tides, tidal channels that directed currents back to the sea and coastal sand dunes.

Joint or fracture patterns within the Entrada sandstone beds created initial zones of weakness. The unweathered joints intersected to form sharp edges and corners with greater surface-area-to-volume ratios than the faces. As a result, the edges and corners weathered more quickly, producing the spherical-shaped ‘goblins’.

The Entrada sandstone from which the hoodoos developed was deposited in the Jurassic period around 170 million years ago.

Source: Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goblin_Valley_State_Park

05-11-21 – Devils Garden


A colorful formation in contrast to the gray cliffs that follow the Hole-in-the-Rock Road, Devil’s Garden is a unique, easily-accessible natural play park. After driving 12 miles down the graded road, there is a signed pullout for this spot designated as an “Outstanding Natural Area.”

As part of the Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, this desert destination features hoodoos, natural arches, and various sandstone formations—some are reminiscent, on a smaller scale, to areas such as Goblin Valley.

Devil’s Garden is a maze of sandstone formations formed by, and continuously shaped by, erosion. Nature’s hand has been at work since the Jurassic Period more than 166 million years ago. Presently, Devil’s Garden boasts hoodoos, arches, and other rock protrusions from the sandy, desert landscape.

Source: Visit Utah
https://www.visitutah.com/articles/devils-garden

Dixie National Forest – Red Canyon


The Red Canyon is located just off Highway 12 en route to Bryce Canyon National Park amid the spectacular red sandstone spires and formations. This area has been called the “most photographed place in Utah”. It is easy to see why, with the brilliant red soil contrasted with the green pines. Offered for sale are a variety of gifts, souveniers, maps, books, tapes, and Smokey Bear collectables. Other offerings include brochures, and trail information. The Red Canyon Trail System is widely known and very popular. Nearby trails include Pink Ledges, Hoodoo, Birdseye and Golden wall. For mountain bike riding there is Thunder Mountain and Red Canyon Bicycle trail that is also used for road bikes. There are miles of ATV trails as well as paved bicycle trails. There are many trails open to foot traffic, as well as bicycle, horse and ATV. Stop by the Visitor Center to pick up a map and guidelines as to the type of traffic each trail allows. Seasonal displays show the area’s flowers, birds, trees and geology. There are permanent displays of area features as well. There are nature hikes, star viewing, and photography opportunities.

Source: USFS
https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/dixie/recarea/?recid=24942