Tag Archives: mono lake

08-17_18-19 – Mono Lake


Mono Lake is a large, shallow saline soda lake in Mono County, California, formed at least 760,000 years ago as a terminal lake in an endorheic basin. The lack of an outlet causes high levels of salts to accumulate in the lake. These salts also make the lake water alkaline.

This desert lake has an unusually productive ecosystem based on brine shrimp that thrive in its waters, and provides critical habitat for two million annual migratory birds that feed on the shrimp and alkali flies. Historically, the native Kutzadika’a people derived nutrition from the Ephydra hians pupae, which live in the shallow waters around the edge of the lake.

When the city of Los Angeles diverted water from the freshwater streams flowing into the lake, it lowered the lake level, which imperiled the migratory birds.

Mono Lake occupies part of the Mono Basin, an endorheic basin that has no outlet to the ocean. Dissolved salts in the runoff thus remain in the lake and raise the water’s pH levels and salt concentration. The tributaries of Mono Lake include Lee Vining Creek, Rush Creek and Mill Creek which flows through Lundy Canyon.

The basin was formed by geological forces over the last five million years: basin and range crustal stretching and associated volcanism and faulting at the base of the Sierra Nevada. Five million years ago, the Sierra Nevada was an eroded set of rolling hills and Mono Basin and Owens Valley did not yet exist.

From 4.5 to 2.6 million years ago, large volumes of basalt were extruded around what is now Cowtrack Mountain (east and south of Mono Basin); eventually covering 300 square miles (780 km2) and reaching a maximum thickness of 600 feet (180 m). Later volcanism in the area occurred 3.8 million to 250,000 years ago. This activity was northwest of Mono Basin and included the formation of Aurora Crater, Beauty Peak, Cedar Hill (later an island in the highest stands of Mono Lake), and Mount Hicks.

Mono Lake is believed to have formed at least 760,000 years ago, dating back to the Long Valley eruption. Sediments located below the ash layer hint that Mono Lake could be a remnant of a larger and older lake that once covered a large part of Nevada and Utah, which would put it among the oldest lakes in North America. At its height during the most recent ice age, the lake would have been about 900 feet (270 m) deep. Prominent old shore lines, called strandlines by geologists, can be seen west of the Lake.

Currently, Mono Lake is in a geologically active area at the north end of the Mono–Inyo Craters volcanic chain and is close to Long Valley Caldera. Volcanic activity continues in the Mono Lake vicinity: the most recent eruption occurred 350 years ago, resulting in the formation of Paoha Island. Panum Crater (on the south shore of the lake) is an example of a combined rhyolite dome and cinder cone.

Tufa towers
Many columns of limestone rise above the surface of Mono Lake. These limestone towers consist primarily of calcium carbonate minerals such as calcite (CaCO3). This type of limestone rock is referred to as tufa, which is a term used for limestone that forms in low to moderate temperatures.

05-24-14 – Mono Lake for Camelopardalids




I raced out to Mono Lake after work to set up to try to capture the Camelopardalid meteor shower. While the meteor shower didn’t quite live up to the more optimistic projections, I was treated to a lovely sunrise, and as I headed north, I saw a hot air balloon practicing in a nearby field.

09-22-12 – Mono Lake

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09-22-12 – Mono Lake, a set on Flickr.

My recent trip to Bodie Ghost Town for a night shoot gave me a chance to briefly visit the ever-lovely Mono Lake.

09-22-12 – Mono Lake Cemetery

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09-22-12 – Mono Lake Cemetery, a set on Flickr.

Nestled near Mono Lake, just off Highway 395, this tiny cemetery only has a few hundred buried here.

Mono Lake Cemetery is operated by Mono County Public Works and is fairly well maintained. There are over 270 identifiable graves and about 60 unidentifiable graves The earliest date of death is 1906 although it is not until the 1920s that others are found. The cemetery contains an American Legion Auxilary Memorial with 91 names of veterans. Not all names can be found on tombstones in the cemetery.

To reach this cemetery from Lee Vinning, Mono Co., CA drive 4.3 miles north on Hwy 395 to Cemetery Road, turn east and drive 1.3 miles. The cemetery is on the right or south side of the road, overlooking the lake.